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Technology

Dogs are more expressive when someone is looking | ScienceDaily

Dogs produce more facial expressions when humans are looking at them, according to new research from the University of Portsmouth. Scientists at the University’s Dog Cognition Centre are the first to find clear evidence dogs move their faces in direct response to human attention. Dogs don’t respond with more facial expressions upon seeing tasty food, suggesting that dogs produce facial ... Read More »

Engineers develop a programmable ‘camouflaging’ material inspired by octopus skin | ScienceDaily

For the octopus and cuttlefish, instantaneously changing their skin color and pattern to disappear into the environment is just part of their camouflage prowess. These animals can also swiftly and reversibly morph their skin into a textured, 3D surface, giving the animal a ragged outline that mimics seaweed, coral, or other objects it detects and uses for camouflage. This week, ... Read More »

New transistor design enables flexible, high-performance wearable/mobile electronics | KurzweilAI

A team of University of Wisconsin–Madison (UW–Madison) engineers has created “the most functional flexible transistor in the world,” along with a fast, simple, inexpensive fabrication process that’s easily scalable to the commercial level. The development promises to allow manufacturers to add advanced, smart-wireless capabilities to wearable and mobile devices that curve, bend, stretch and move.* The UW–Madison group’s advance is ... Read More »

Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreeding | ScienceDaily

Early humans seem to have recognised the dangers of inbreeding at least 34,000 years ago, and developed surprisingly sophisticated social and mating networks to avoid it, new research has found. The study, reported in the journal Science, examined genetic information from the remains of anatomically modern humans who lived during the Upper Palaeolithic, a period when modern humans from Africa first ... Read More »

‘Squirtable’ elastic surgical glue seals wounds in 60 seconds: Emergency treatments could be transformed, saving lives | ScienceDaily

A highly elastic and adhesive surgical glue that quickly seals wounds without the need for common staples or sutures could transform how surgeries are performed. Biomedical engineers from the University of Sydney and the United States collaborated on the development of the potentially life-saving surgical glue, called MeTro. MeTro’s high elasticity makes it ideal for sealing wounds in body tissues ... Read More »

Unique gene therapy prevents, reverses multiple sclerosis in animal model | ScienceDaily

Multiple sclerosis can be inhibited or reversed in mouse models using a novel gene therapy technique to suppress the immune response that induces the disease, University of Florida Health researchers have found. By combining the transfer of a brain-protein gene with a drug used in organ transplant recipients, the researchers essentially cured mice of multiple sclerosis, resulting in near-complete remission ... Read More »

Raccoons solve an ancient puzzle, but do they really understand it? Study investigates whether mammals understand the principles of water displacement | ScienceDaily

Scientists have been using an ancient Greek fable written by Aesop as inspiration to test whether birds and small children understand cause and effect relationships. In “The Crow and the Pitcher,” a thirsty crow realises it should drop stones into a pitcher in order to raise the water level high enough so that the bird is able to drink it. ... Read More »

Futurist Ray Kurzweil Isn’t Worried About Technology Stealing Your Job | Fortune.com

You know a topic is trending when the likes of Tesla’s Elon Musk and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg publicly bicker about its potential risks and rewards. In this case, Musk says he fears artificial intelligence will lead to World War III because nations will compete for A.I. superiority. Zuckerberg, meanwhile, has called such doomsday scenarios “irresponsible” and says he is optimistic ... Read More »

Dogs’ social skills linked to oxytocin sensitivity | ScienceDaily

The tendency of dogs to seek contact with their owners is associated with genetic variations in sensitivity for the hormone oxytocin, according to a new study from Linköping University, Sweden. The results have been published in the scientific journal Hormones and Behavior and contribute to our knowledge of how dogs have changed during their development from wolf to household pet. ... Read More »