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The Crossroads of Special Operations

Friday, April 16, 2021

Congress Questions Whether U.S. Special Operations Forces Should Remain In High Demand | NPR

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U.S. special forces make up only 2% of the military. Congress is questioning whether the U.S. special forces can continue to fight the bulk of America’s battles.

Nearly 18 years after the U.S. began fighting in Afghanistan, special operations forces remain in high demand. These elite troops are deployed around the globe, and the strain may be showing. A handful of special operators have been charged with drug trafficking and violent crime. Six Navy SEALs will be on trial this year for war crimes.

And all of this has military leaders and some members of Congress questioning whether special operations forces can keep up the pace. Steve Walsh reports from member station KPBS in San Diego.

 

Source: Congress Questions Whether U.S. Special Operations Forces Should Remain In High Demand | NPR

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White House won’t say whether special operations troops will remain in Afghanistan after Sept. 11 | Washington Examiner

After President Joe Biden's promise of a full military withdrawal by Sept. 11, the White House remains silent whether...

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