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The Crossroads of Special Operations

Friday, April 16, 2021

Parasitic plants use stolen genes to make them better parasites | Science Daily

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Some parasitic plants steal genetic material from their host plants and use the stolen genes to more effectively siphon off the host’s nutrients. A new study led by researchers at Penn State and Virginia Tech reveals that the parasitic plant dodder has stolen a large amount of genetic material from its hosts, including over 100 functional genes. These stolen genes contribute to dodder’s ability to latch onto and steal nutrients from the host and even to send genetic weapons back into the host. The new study appears July 22, 2019, in the journal Nature Plants.

Source: Parasitic plants use stolen genes to make them better parasites | Science Daily

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White House won’t say whether special operations troops will remain in Afghanistan after Sept. 11 | Washington Examiner

After President Joe Biden's promise of a full military withdrawal by Sept. 11, the White House remains silent whether...

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