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They sought help when their Army dad deployed. Now they’re barred from joining the military. | Military Times
Courtesy of the De La Rosa family

They sought help when their Army dad deployed. Now they’re barred from joining the military. | Military Times

By seeking counseling for their two teenage daughters as their family coped with multiple moves and multiple deployments to Afghanistan, an Army major and his wife unwittingly prevented both girls from following their father, their grandfather and their great-grandfather into military service.

Rudy and Mia De La Rosa thought they were providing emotional support for daughters Juliet and Samantha.

Neither the parents nor the daughters knew there were notations like “suicidal gesture” or “self-mutilation” in their counseling files. And neither knew Army and Air Force medical providers would have access to those records — and anything else in dependent medical records — if their daughters ever enlisted.

This sets them apart from their civilian counterparts, who don’t come into the military with a previous electronic health record. It sets them apart from military dependents entering the Navy and the Marine Corps, which don’t merge dependent and service member records. And it puts the actions of the Army and Air Force in their cases, and those involving other dependents, at odds with the ethical judgement of some medical experts.

Source: They sought help when their Army dad deployed. Now they’re barred from joining the military. | Military Times