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Commentary: Why behavioral health care outside the military falls short for troops, families | Military Times
Spc. Chenee' Brooks/Army

Commentary: Why behavioral health care outside the military falls short for troops, families | Military Times

Dr. Jenna Brown-Morgan, who works for the Military Health System, recently traveled 7,500 miles to fully understand the unique and emerging needs of a specific Army unit so she could best tailor treatment services for them when they returned home several weeks later.

A civilian psychologist employed by the Army, she worked in Afghanistan with members of a combat unit to identify soldiers with symptoms of behavioral health conditions that may need treatment. She consulted with unit leaders to understand factors that had impacted the soldiers’ well-being, such as who had done the most fighting or had lived in the toughest conditions. She crafted treatment plans for individual soldiers and delivered talks on challenges returning soldiers commonly encounter, such as insomnia, alcohol use and family reintegration.

Brown-Morgan leads an Embedded Behavioral Health clinic on Hunter Army Airfield in northeast Georgia. Her team is made up of a group of mental health professionals who work out of a small medical building far from the main hospital but within walking distance of where the soldiers live and work.

Source: Commentary: Why behavioral health care outside the military falls short for troops, families | Military Times