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Canada’s special forces face unique mental-health challenges | CTV News
Senior Airman Matthew Bruch

Canada’s special forces face unique mental-health challenges | CTV News

Retired Sgt. Toby Miller can easily remember the day he was injured by an improvised-explosive device in Afghanistan. It was April 2, 2011 – his 41st birthday, and the beginning of the end of his military career.

Miller returned to duty a short time later, but he knew something wasn’t right. When a comrade noticed that he wasn’t doing well and suggested he seek help, Miller decided that might be best.

“I went into that meeting and it was abundantly clear to the psychologist that I was probably in no shape to still be doing the job,” Miller recalled during a recent phone interview from his home in Comox, B.C.

“I was eventually diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries. There are three dark spots on the left side of my brain that indicate some likely dead spots. And PTSD. I had nightmares for a long time. I still do.”

Seeking help for PTSD and even leaving the military are hard enough for many service members, especially those who have never known anything else but life in the Canadian Armed Forces.

Source: Canada’s special forces face unique mental-health challenges | CTV News