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Women in special forces: What the U.S. can learn from the Afghans
In this Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 photo, a female member of Afghan special forces aims her pistol during a training exercise on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghanistan's army is training female special forces to take part in night raids against insurgents despite cultural taboos as foreign combat troops take the backseat ahead of their eventual departure at the end of 2014. In a country where women traditionally are expected to stay home, their participation in the special forces is breaking new ground in ultraconservative Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

Women in special forces: What the U.S. can learn from the Afghans

By any measure, the number of women serving in the Afghan Special Security Forces is small — 80 women out of some 14,000 personnel. But while many are relegated to support roles, about 20 of the women are employed as members of the tactical platoons and counterintelligence units integral to the effectiveness of the special security forces.

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