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Dana Milbank: For a grievously wounded soldier, a better side of America

Dana Milbank: For a grievously wounded soldier, a better side of America

In the first days of the Iraq war 11 years ago, Army reservist Jay Briseno was shot in the back of the head at a Baghdad market. The bullet left him blind, brain-damaged, paralyzed from the neck down and unable to communicate, eat or breathe on his own.

He is perhaps the most grievously wounded soldier to survive the war, or any war. On any number of occasions, his parents have been told to prepare themselves for his death.
But on Monday morning, Jay Briseno smiled — broadly and unmistakably. It happened when a quartet of Washington Redskins cheerleaders came to greet him, part of an elaborate and long-deserved gesture of thanks. Country singer Lee Greenwood sang the National Anthem and his own celebrated anthem, “God Bless the USA” (“I’m proud to be an American, where at least I know I’m free”). The Redskins’ Darrel Young spoke. And a consortium of local businesses and national charities presented Briseno’s parents with the keys to a new home in Manassas, equipped with the lifts, medical electronics and hospital equipment needed to keep the 31-year-old veteran alive.

“Jay hasn’t taken a real bath for the last 11 years,” his father, Joe Briseno, told the crowd of hundreds of veterans, firefighters, Boy Scouts, schoolchildren and neighbors. “He can now. . . . Although his quality of life was taken away when he was injured, now we’re slowly giving it back.”

The elder Briseno, also a veteran, wept with gratitude. “This,” he said, “is what America is about.”

It is. There was Greenwood, a self-described conservative Christian whose music is standard at Republican political rallies. Speaking, too, was Brig. Gen. Tammy Smith, deputy chief of staff of the Army Reserve and the first openly gay American general. Eighty businesses contributed to the home-building. Meredith Iler, whose charity was one of the leaders of the long effort, said that no question was ever asked about politics or about views of the war that took thousands of American lives. What matters, she told the Briseno family, is “when you walk through that door, it’s a bear hug from America.”

Read More:Dana Milbank: For a grievously wounded soldier, a better side of America – The Washington Post.

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